Film68: Bullitt

Anti-heroes have a way of holding a mirror up to their audiences. Whether a viewer likes it or not, these less than perfect creations reflect society’s true identities over the all too common unattainable ideals that accompany any decade. 1960s cinema was grappling with these imperfections, as filmgoers and filmmakers alike stared into a void …

Favourites: Top 5 Classic And Modern Westerns

Here at 25YLSite, we handle a lot of heavy lifting. Analysis, interpretation, deep discussion, introspective interviews… you name it, we’ve got it. “Favorites” takes a lighter approach to the material we normally cover. Each week, we will take you through a list of favorites – whether it’s moments, scenes, episodes, characters, lines of dialogue, whatever! …

On-Screen, Off-Screen: Cormac McCarthy or How I Learned to Stop Believing in Anything and Love The Void

"On-Screen, Off-Screen" is our new monthly film series created to showcase a more personal retrospective about some of our favourite filmmakers. Each month, one 25YL staffer will choose one of their own favourite filmmakers - be it a director or performer or writer or composer or production designer, etc - and will analyse what it …

Favorites Special: We are One! The 25YL staff choose their favorite articles from the last 12 months

Welcome back to our weekly series Favorites! This week we are doing something extra special as its our 1st birthday! We have come a very long way this year, you can read more about that here in this letter from our Chief. It seemed apt then that we should look back at some of the …

The Hopeless Dream of Being: Unlocking Ingmar Bergman’s Persona and Finding Clues to Mulholland Drive

Ingmar Bergman Persona

“I like Bergman, but his films are so different,” says David Lynch at one point in Lynch on Lynch. “Sparse. Sparse dreams.” He’s just been effusively discussing how Fellini’s films make him dream, in magical and lyrical ways. Which leads him on to Bergman. Bergman’s work has another dream quality to it and Lynch gets …

Trying to Take Me Back Somewhere: The Proto-Lynchian Unease of Carnival of Souls

Carnival of Souls is a curio indeed. A 1962 low-budget American picture shot in black and white using mostly non-professional actors, it’s the sole feature by industrial filmmaker Herk Harvey. The staging is clumsy, the acting more so, and the narrative engine seems unsure of where it’s heading. And yet the magic of cinema is …